Post Flood Recon

Fishing opportunities in SoCal and up 395 to Mammoth
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Matt
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Post Flood Recon

Postby Matt » Tue Mar 01, 2005 11:14 pm

Took Sunday to look at our beleagured streams. Planned to hit 5 separate streams in one day. Purpose: recon and photo op, well maybe wet a line if possible. Unnamed Creeks 1 and 2 were shut down due to access problems: CHP, CalTrans, USFS. Unnamed Creek #3 was running probably 20 times what I'd seen in the past. Image

Image
But it did produce one feisty little survivor, so all hope is not lost:Image
On to Unnamed Creek #4. Running exteremely high, and off color, but not muddy, more "glacier-y" than anything. Looks to be about Class II or III whitewater. This stretch is usually a gravel riverbed with one narrow channel holding the creek.Image
This is the confluence of Unnamed #3 and #4. Definitely Class III, normally could not float a kayak at all.
Image
Access to Unnamed #5 was denied at chosen access point by large neon orange BLM "No Trespassing" signs. Lesson learned: CALL the Ranger station before going, they are your best bet on getting access info.
Last edited by Matt on Mon Mar 28, 2005 11:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Richard
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Postby Richard » Wed Mar 02, 2005 10:21 am

Nice shots, Matt -- reminiscent of Sierra freestone creeks during spring runoff. Of course, those waters are relatively adapted to such conditions. I don't have a clue as to how geologic conditions down in your part of the state will affect sedimentation, with its spinoff impact on aquatic insects and spawning gravels, among others.

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Postby SoCalFF » Wed Mar 02, 2005 6:55 pm

I echo Richards comments, very nice pics Matt! When the waters receed a bit it should be a very nice season locally this year.

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Matt
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Postby Matt » Wed Mar 02, 2005 10:13 pm

Richard wrote:Nice shots, Matt -- reminiscent of Sierra freestone creeks during spring runoff. Of course, those waters are relatively adapted to such conditions.

It's funny, because now more than ever, I am interested in the the "cycle". Foremost being "How do the fish survive here on such little water?" These creeks I recon'ed were at one time planted by the DFG, and we had caught our share from these put-and-take waters. But all along they held "wild" populations, and in some cases "native" populations. As I have looked further, over the last 100 years or so, as long as we have been keeping records, there have been events similar to this. The "El Nino" we now tend to call them, but have happened on a fairly regular basis going back into the record books. This season, for sure, has been among the biggest, but others have certainly happened over the last century, the last milennium, no, across millennia. And the trout continue to survive, despite in some cases, our "best" effort to eradicate them. And this is where I get really interested. How does that work? Some of these creeks are the next thing to dry in some years, or silted in, or blocked or paved by us in an attempt to control these waters. Yet the fish survive, and continue on. That is what holds my interest now. Clearly they have adapted to our semi arid climate, with it's wild swings in precipitation. Ah, behold Nature's mystery! I just feel lucky to be able witness and track it, if for nothing more than my own personal edification.

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More like psycho!

Postby LARiver » Fri Mar 04, 2005 12:57 am

Matt wrote: ... now more than ever, I am interested in the the "cycle". Foremost being "How do the fish survive here on such little water?"


Matt,

I have shared a fascination with this riddle as well. One of my most trustworthy contacts in the region(s) that you cover has done both fisheries and amphibian surveys and tells some great stories. We're talking bundles of trout crammed under a root ball of a willow adjascent to a cool spring in a tiny pool, isolated from any moving water. They'll dart out to feed for a brief moment at dawn or dusk and otherwise continue their "reverse hibernation" until there's more water. These fish are incredible.

B.

FrankGarza

Re: Post Flood Recon

Postby FrankGarza » Thu Jan 01, 2015 1:14 am

Good photos, He -- reminiscent of Sierra freestone creeks while in planting season runoff. Of course, individuals waters are usually relatively adapted for you to this kind of circumstances. My partner and i do not have some sort of concept about how geologic circumstances decrease with your area of the point out will affect sedimentation, with its spinoff impact on water pests along with spawning gravels, and others.

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Re: Post Flood Recon

Postby rustYmorRis » Wed Aug 12, 2015 4:46 am

Very Good effort!I appreciate all of your images. I hope you know how much value these.We can't even find the right words to tell you how incredibly stunning the pictures are,thank you from the bottom of hearts.


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